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Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of Machining and related characteristics of United States hardwoods found in the catalog.

Machining and related characteristics of United States hardwoods

E. M. Davis

Machining and related characteristics of United States hardwoods

by E. M. Davis

  • 238 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Hardwoods -- United States.,
    • Wood -- Testing.

    • Edition Notes

      Supersedes his Machining and related characteristics of sourthern hardwoods, issued as Technical bulletin no. 824.

      Other titlesUnited States hardwoods.
      Statementby E.M. Davis.
      SeriesTechnical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture ;, no. 1267, Technical bulletin (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) ;, no. 1267.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsS21 .A72 no. 1267
      The Physical Object
      Paginationiii, 68 p. :
      Number of Pages68
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL238929M
      LC Control Numberagr62000392
      OCLC/WorldCa6539689

      2 Processing-induced Characteristics that Influence Grades Manufacturing Imperfections Related to Grain. Chipped or torn grain is a machining defect usually caused by machining or cutting against the grain. The end result is an irregularity in the surface of the lumber caused by small pieces of wood torn from the surface below the plane of cut.   In the United States, property relationships are used for a variety of purposes (Green and Kretschmann ). The MOR-MOE relationship is used to help establish mechanical grades. Relationships between MOR and other strength properties, such as with UTS and UCS, are also used to estimate properties of mechanically graded lumber (ASTM D ).

      The look of our land an airphoto atlas of the rural United States: North Central. () AH The look of our land an airphoto atlas of the rural United States: the East and South. () AH The look of our land an airphoto atlas of the rural United States: the Far West. () AH Approximately 20 percent of the timber harvested in the United States each year is from _____ _____-, probably making it the most important species of tree in the United States today. balsam fir Lumber from _____ ______ is usually used for framing buildings, but the trees are often used as Christmas trees.

      publications are sent to more than 1, libraries in the United States and elsewhere. The Forest Products Laboratory is maintained in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service is a diverse organization committed to equal opportunity in employment and program delivery. Lumber (North American English) or timber (as used in other areas) is a type of wood that has been processed into beams and planks, a stage in the process of wood is mainly used for structural purposes but has many other uses as well. There are two main types of lumber. It may be supplied either rough-sawn, or surfaced on one or more of its faces.


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Machining and related characteristics of United States hardwoods by E. M. Davis Download PDF EPUB FB2

Machining and related characteristics of United States hardwoods (Technical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture) [Davis, E.

M] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Machining and related characteristics of United States hardwoods (Technical bulletin / United States Department of Agriculture)Author: E.

M Davis. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Davis, E.M. (Edward Manning), Machining and related characteristics of United States hardwoods. Machining and Related Characteristics of United States Hardwoods By E.

DAVIS, Wood Technologist, Forest Products Laboratory (Maintained at Madison, Wis., in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin) Technical Bulletin No.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREST SERVICE Washington, D.C. August For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government. Machining and Related Characteristics of United States Hardwoods By E.

DAVIS, Wood Technologist, Forest Products Laboratory (Maintained at Madison, Wis., in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin) Technical Bulletin No. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE • FOREST SERVICE Washington, D.C. August Davis, E. M., "Machining and Related Characteristics of United States Hardwoods," Technical BulletinsUnited States Department of Agriculture, Economic.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Davis, E.M. (Edward Manning), Machining and related characteristics of Southern hardwoods. Washington: U.S. Dept. MacHining and Related Characteristics of Southern Hardwoods # [E.M. Davis, Photos & Graphs] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : E.M.

Davis. Therefore it is important to evaluate the machining parameters and relate them to raw material characteristics. The machining properties of several species have been reported in previous works. Davis [2] studied machining and related properties of 32 hardwoods grown in the United by: The data in this section (Tables through -4) are selected from Machining and Related Characteristics of United States Hardwoods by E.

Davis, U.S.D.A. Technical Bulletin No. and are based on planing. Be aware that in these tests various adjustments could have been made to optimize cutting; the effort was to indicate trends and effects. Machining and Related Characteristics of United States Hardwoods.

Technical Bulletin No.United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. Author: Tomy Listyanto, Muhammad Navis Rofii, Keisuke Ando, Nobuaki Hattori. on the machining and related properties of fifteen of these woods for compari-son with native hardwoods and to determine to what extent the tests that have already been developed for native hardwoods are applicable to tropical species.

The machining properties that were investigated were planing, shaping, turn-ing, sanding, boring and mortising. publications are sent to more than 1, libraries in the United States and elsewhere.

The Forest Products Laboratory is maintained in cooperation with the University of Wisconsin. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service is a diverse organization committed to equal opportunity in employment and program Size: KB.

Effect of machining on surface roughness of wood Machining and related characteristics of United States. Several studies have sought to evaluate the effect of machining on surface roughness. New Books Since June 2nd, This list is updated every Thursday. Titles are arranged in call number order.

Machining and related characteristics of Southern hardwoods / by E.M. Davis. Washington: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Machining and related characteristics of United States hardwoods / by E.M. Davis. Washington: U.S. Dept. DOCS A C / z,' BLACK CHERRY Black cherry, also commonly called cherry, grows in significant commercial quantities only in the north- ern Allegheny Mountains.

Cherry wood is reddish and takes a lustrous finish; it is a prized furniture wood and brings high prices in veneer log form. lt is straight-grained moderately hard, and stable; it. Hardwoods -- North America; Used for: Hard woods; Filed under: Hardwoods. Knife planing across the grain can be applied to hardwoods / (St.

Paul: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station, ), by Harold A. Stewart and Minn.) North Central Forest Experiment Station (Saint Paul (page images at HathiTrust). () Williams, D. and R. Morris. Machining and related mechanical properties of 15 B.C.

wood species. Special pub. SP Forintek Canada Corp., Vancouver, BC, Canada, TABLE Machining properties of white spruce wood from 25 provenances grown in a. Their Machining, Seasoning and Related Characteristics by FRANKLIN R. LONGWOOD Northeastern Forest Experiment Station, Forest Service; formerly at the Tropical Forest Research Center of the Forest Service in Puerto Rico Growth Through Agricultural Progress U.S.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agriculture Handbook No. FOREST SERVICE Issued. Rubberwood lumber is typically taken from rubber plantations where the trees are tapped for latex, and harvested at the end of their useful life cycle—typically after about thirty years.

Common Uses: Furniture, cabinetry, interior millwork, kitchen woodenware (cutting boards, knife blocks, etc.), and other small, specialty wood items.

Davis, E.M., (), Machining and related characteristics of United States hardwoods, Technical Bulletin No:US Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Basswood is also known as Linnwood, or Linn and is prominent in the northeast region of the U.S. Basswood is reddish brown (heartwood) or white (sapwood) in color, porous in grain texture and very light and soft, making it easily worked and very stable.

It is well suited for carvings, mouldings, cabinets & paints well. Basswood is known as the.The sap and fruits, along with bird droppings, in season, drive my long-suffering brother batty. The leaves look, to me, to be so similar to prized tropical hardwoods, particularly the rosewoods, I’d wondered if it is related, or possesses any of the same desirable characteristics, making it.

In the classic “Machining and Related Characteristics of United States Hardwoods” (E.M. Davis, USFS Forest Products Laboratory), the author tested 25 species of hardwoods for steam-bending characteristics and concluded: “Specific gravity influenced bending, in that the heavy woods bent better than the light woods.